Tuesday, November 3, 2015

What The IRS Does Not Want You To Know - What You Need to Know About an IRS Offer in Compromise


Settle Tax Debt with an Offer in Compromise

Figuring out how you, a financially struggling taxpayer, will be receiving income tax help can be tricky. You have day to day expenses such as rent, a car payment, groceries, utilities, day care and any other debts (child support, alimony, health insurance) to worry about. If you’ve never had an income tax problem with the IRS, an “Offer in Compromise” may not be a phrase you’re familiar with. This is just one of the options that can make handling your IRS tax debt a lot simpler and affordable to get tax relief.

Often, mistakenly, called “Offer and Compromise”, an Offer in Compromise is a settlement agreement between you – the taxpayer and the IRS. This allows you to resolve your income tax debt for far less than you owe. This can be a great solution for you, provided you qualify. The IRS doesn't call it the "Fresh Start Initiative" for nothing.


Seeking an IRS Settlement

When you attempt an Offer in Compromise (OIC), IRS scrutiny is to be expected. The IRS is not going to settle your income tax debt without proof that you are struggling. This means that you’ll be required to hand over a detailed financial report, itemizing your revenue streams as well as your monthly expenses. If approved by the IRS, Offer in Compromise (OIC) conditions must be met to the letter or your settlement will be invalidated.

Again, not to be confused with the nonexistent IRS “offer and compromise”, an actual Offer in Compromise (OIC) doesn’t work in a typical negotiation fashion. In other words, you don’t barter for a lower total to pay back. After reviewing your application for an IRS settlement, IRS officials may take as long as a year to determine whether or not you’ll be approved. We always tell our clients that the Offer in Compromise process is a lot like "watching paint dry."

The expiration date for your back taxes owed is ten years from the date of assessment, but the Offer in Compromise program suspends the clock for however long it takes for you to be approved or denied. This process time then gets tacked back on once your case has concluded. There will not be “offers” in compromise; the IRS won’t let you simply choose which IRS settlement sounds the most attractive. You’ll be expected to pay the reduced amount within a limited time frame; failure to do so can result in termination of your settlement agreement, forcing you to start over.



Are You Eligible to Settle?

FIND OUT

1-8 0 0 - 5 8 9 - 3 0 7 8


What to Watch Out For

Beyond meeting the terms of your settlement agreement, you shouldn’t bank on being qualified. Although many requests are made to the IRS, compromise offers account for only a small percentage of formal tax debt resolutions each year. Currently, the IRS is accepting 42% of the Offer in Compromise submissions. 

READ MORE:


Settle Tax Debt with an Offer in Compromise

Figuring out how you, a financially struggling taxpayer, will be receiving income tax help can be tricky. You have day to day expenses such as rent, a car payment, groceries, utilities, day care and any other debts (child support, alimony, health insurance) to worry about. If you’ve never had an income tax problem with the IRS, an “Offer in Compromise” may not be a phrase you’re familiar with. This is just one of the options that can make handling your IRS tax debt a lot simpler and affordable to get tax relief.

Often, mistakenly, called “Offer and Compromise”, an Offer in Compromise is a settlement agreement between you – the taxpayer and the IRS. This allows you to resolve your income tax debt for far less than you owe. This can be a great solution for you, provided you qualify. The IRS doesn't call it the "Fresh Start Initiative" for nothing.


Seeking an IRS Settlement

When you attempt an Offer in Compromise (OIC), IRS scrutiny is to be expected. The IRS is not going to settle your income tax debt without proof that you are struggling. This means that you’ll be required to hand over a detailed financial report, itemizing your revenue streams as well as your monthly expenses. If approved by the IRS, Offer in Compromise (OIC) conditions must be met to the letter or your settlement will be invalidated.

Again, not to be confused with the nonexistent IRS “offer and compromise”, an actual Offer in Compromise (OIC) doesn’t work in a typical negotiation fashion. In other words, you don’t barter for a lower total to pay back. After reviewing your application for an IRS settlement, IRS officials may take as long as a year to determine whether or not you’ll be approved. We always tell our clients that the Offer in Compromise process is a lot like "watching paint dry."

The expiration date for your back taxes owed is ten years from the date of assessment, but the Offer in Compromise program suspends the clock for however long it takes for you to be approved or denied. This process time then gets tacked back on once your case has concluded. There will not be “offers” in compromise; the IRS won’t let you simply choose which IRS settlement sounds the most attractive. You’ll be expected to pay the reduced amount within a limited time frame; failure to do so can result in termination of your settlement agreement, forcing you to start over.



Are You Eligible to Settle?

FIND OUT

1-8 0 0 - 5 8 9 - 3 0 7 8


What to Watch Out For

Beyond meeting the terms of your settlement agreement, you shouldn’t bank on being qualified. Although many requests are made to the IRS, compromise offers account for only a small percentage of formal tax debt resolutions each year. Currently, the IRS is accepting 42% of the Offer in Compromise submissions. 

FLAT FEE TAX SERVICE, INC.

90% OF OUR CLIENTS HAVE BEEN SUCCESSFUL

Your best bet if you think you might be eligible for an Offer in Compromise (OIC) is to look for an IRS resolution company with experience in such matters such as the expert IRS Tax Attorneys at Flat Fee Tax Service, Inc.

When you’re considering an Offer in Compromise, help from an experienced tax resolution professional is definitely going to be your best course of action. But don’t be discouraged if your tax pro concludes that you’re not likely to be approved for an Offer in Compromise; IRS tax defense resolutions abound, based on your circumstances. So rather than testing the waters by completing 433a Offer in Compromise (OIC) yourself, ask our IRS Tax Relief Team if that’s your best move. You may be provided with a solution that is even better for your situation.


READ MORE:

http://www.thebestirshelp.com/blog/post/irs-settlement


FLAT FEE TAX SERVICE, INC.

90% OF OUR CLIENTS HAVE BEEN SUCCESSFUL

Your best bet if you think you might be eligible for an Offer in Compromise (OIC) is to look for an IRS resolution company with experience in such matters such as the expert IRS Tax Attorneys at Flat Fee Tax Service, Inc.

When you’re considering an Offer in Compromise, help from an experienced tax resolution professional is definitely going to be your best course of action. But don’t be discouraged if your tax pro concludes that you’re not likely to be approved for an Offer in Compromise; IRS tax defense resolutions abound, based on your circumstances. So rather than testing the waters by completing 433a Offer in Compromise (OIC) yourself, ask our IRS Tax Relief Team if that’s your best move. You may be provided with a solution that is even better for your situation.

FLAT FEE TAX SERVICE, INC.:
  1. Guided by our Christian Values.
  2. Accredited by the Better Business Bureau. A Plus Rating.
  3. No Client Complaints.
  4. Experienced IRS Tax Attorneys Work Directly with You.
  5. IRS Wage Levies Stopped in One (1) Day.
  6. 90% of our Clients who have Submitted an Offer in Compromise have received a Successful IRS Settlement.
  7. Low, Affordable Fees.
  8. Our Clients Get Positive Results.
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